Self Pollinating Pear Trees (17 Pear Varieties That Self Pollinate)


Some pear trees need another tree nearby to ensure pollination and fruit production.  Others are self-pollinating and will produce fruit all by themselves.

So, which pear trees are self-pollinating?  Some self-pollinating pear trees include: Bartlett, Colette Everbearing, Comice, Fan-Cris, Fan-Stil, Hosui Asian, Kieffer Improved, Max Red Bartlett, Monterrey, Nuisseiki Asian, Orient, Pineapple, Seckel, Stark Custom Graft 2-N-1 European/Asian, Stark Honeysweet, Sugar, and Warren Pears.

Of course, planting other pear trees near these ones can increase the size of your harvest.  You can also plant a few different types of pear trees to stagger your harvest times and get a longer window for fresh pears.

In this article, we’ll give a list of 17 self-pollinating pear trees, along with some information about each variety.

Let’s get going.

17 Self-Pollinating Pear Trees

Some varieties of pear (Pyrus communis) are self-pollinating.  This means that you only need that one tree to produce fruit.

pear buds
Some pear trees are self-pollinating and do not need another tree nearby to produce fruit.

Pear trees generally produce fruit 4 to 6 years after planting (3 to 4 years for dwarf varieties).

Here are some self-pollinating pear varieties to consider for your garden:

  • Bartlett Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is semi-dwarf, reaching a height of 12 to 15 feet and a width of 10 to 12 feet.  It produces white flowers and golden yellow fruit with some pink color for good measure.  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 8.  You can learn more about the Bartlett Pear from Gurney’s.
Bartlett Pears
Bartlett pear trees are self-pollinating, so you only need one to get fruit.
  • Colette Everbearing Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is available in two sizes: dwarf (reaches 8 to 10 feet tall and 6 to 7 feet wide) or standard (reaches 18 to 20 feet tall and 12 to 13 feet wide).  It produces white flowers and yellow fruit with some pink color in mid to late September.  It is adapted to Zones 4 to 8.  You can learn more about the Colette Everbearing Pear from Stark Brothers.
  • Comice Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is semi-dwarf, reaching a height of 12 to 15 feet and a width of 10 to 12 feet.  It produces white flowers and yellow-green fruit with some red blush in August.  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 8 and stores well in cool temperatures for 5 months or more.  You can learn more about the Comice Pear from Gurney’s.
Comice Pear
Comice pear trees are self-pollinating and produce yellow-green fruit with a red blush.
  • Fan-Cris Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is semi-dwarf, reaching a height of 12 to 15 feet and a width of 10 to 12 feet.  It produces white flowers and light green fruit that is good for desserts.  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 8 and has good resistance to fire blight.  You can learn more about the Fan-Cris Pear from Gurney’s.
  • Fan-Stil Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is semi-dwarf, reaching a height of 12 to 15 feet and a width of 10 to 12 feet.  It produces white flowers and yellow fruit with a pale red blush in late August to September.  It is adapted to Zones 6 to 9 (may survive in Zone 5) and has good resistance to fire blight.  You can learn more about the Fan-Stil Pear from Gurney’s.
  • Hosui Asian Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is available in two sizes: dwarf (reaches 8 to 10 feet tall and 6 to 7 feet wide) or standard (reaches 18 to 20 feet tall and 12 to 13 feet wide).  It produces white flowers and yellow-brown fruit with some pink color in late August.  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 9 and is heat-tolerant.  You can learn more about the Hosui Asian Pear from Stark Brothers.
Hosui Asian Pears
Hosui Asian pears are self-pollinating and more round than standard pears.
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Sage Ross via:
Wikimedia Commons:
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Hosui_Asian_pears_at_
Lyman_Orchards,_
2009-08-30.jpg
  • Kieffer Improved Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is standard size, reaching a height of up to 25 feet and a width of up to 25 feet.  It produces white flowers and golden yellow fruit with some brown specks and crimson blush in late September or October.  It is adapted to Zones 7 to 8 and has strong resistance to fire blight.  You can learn more about the Kieffer Improved Pear from Gurney’s.
Kieffer Pears
Kieffer pear trees are self-pollinating and produce golden yellow fruit with some brown specks and red blush.
  • Max Red Bartlett Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is semi-dwarf, reaching a height of 12 to 15 feet and a width of 10 to 12 feet.  It produces white flowers and golden yellow fruit with some pink and red color, maturing in August and September.  It is adapted to Zones 4 to 8.  You can learn more about the Max Red Bartlett Pear from Gurney’s.
  • Monterrey Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is semi-dwarf, reaching a height of 12 to 15 feet and a width of 10 to 12 feet.  It produces white flowers and yellow-green fruit in August and September.  It is adapted to Zones 6 to 9 and originated in Mexico.  You can learn more about the Monterrey Pear from Gurney’s.
  • Nuisseiki Asian Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is semi-dwarf, reaching a height of 12 to 15 feet and a width of 10 to 12 feet.  It produces white flowers and yellow-green fruit in July to mid-August.  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 8.  You can learn more about the Nuisseiki Asian Pear from Gurney’s.
  • Orient Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is semi-dwarf, reaching a height of 12 to 15 feet and a width of 10 to 12 feet.  It produces white flowers and yellow fruit with brown specks in August.  It is adapted to Zones 6 to 9 and has medium resistance to fire blight.  You can learn more about the Orient Pear from Gurney’s.
  • Pineapple Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is standard size and reaches 18 to 20 feet tall and 12 to 13 feet wide.  It produces white flowers and yellow fruit with a red blush in August.  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 8.  You can learn more about the Pineapple Pear from Stark Brothers.
  • Seckel Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is semi-dwarf, reaching a height of 12 to 15 feet and a width of 10 to 12 feet.  It produces white flowers and golden-green fruit with red blush in September.  It is adapted to Zones 4 to 8.  You can learn more about the Seckel Pear from Gurney’s.
Seckel Pear
Seckel pear trees are self-pollinating and produce golden-green fruit with a red blush.
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Vegan Feast Catering via:
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Seckel_Pear_
(4466279290).jpg
  • Stark Custom Graft 2-N-1 European/Asian Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is standard size and reaches 18 to 20 feet tall and 12 to 13 feet wide.  It produces white flowers and two types of fruit: yellow-green fruit with a red blush (European) and round yellow-tan fruit (Asian).  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 8, and comes as a result of grafting pear trees together.  You can learn more about the Stark Custom Graft 2-N-1 European/Asian pear from Stark Brothers.
  • Stark Honeysweet Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is available in two sizes: dwarf (reaches 8 to 10 feet tall and 6 to 7 feet wide) or standard (reaches 18 to 20 feet tall and 12 to 13 feet wide).  It produces white flowers and yellow fruit with some pinkish red blush in early September.  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 8.  You can learn more about the Stark Honeysweet Pear from Stark Brothers.
  • Sugar Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is semi-dwarf, reaching a height of 12 to 15 feet and a width of 10 to 12 feet.  It produces white flowers and yellow-brown fruit with red blush in mid to late August.  It is adapted to Zones 7 to 9.  You can learn more about the Sugar Pear from Gurney’s.
  • Warren Pear – this self-pollinating pear variety is standard sized, reaching a height of up to 25 feet and a width of up to 25 feet.  It produces white flowers and light green fruit with brown specks in mid to late August.  It is adapted to Zones 7 to 9 and has high resistance to fire blight.  You can learn more about the Warren Pear from Gurney’s.

Remember that all of the pear varieties mentioned in the list above are self-pollinating.  You don’t need another tree to produce fruit, but having two or more trees of different varieties close together may improve your harvest.

pear blossom
Having multiple self-pollinating pear trees can improve yields.

Conclusion

Now you know a little more about self-pollinating pear trees.  You also know how to choose different types to stagger harvest dates and get fresh fruit for a longer time.

You might also want to check out my article on self-pollinating plum trees.

I hope you found this article helpful.  If so, please share it with someone who can use the information.

If you want to read some of my most popular posts, check out the “Best of GreenUpSide” page here.  Enjoy!

~Jonathon

jonathon.david.madore

Hi, I'm Jon. Let's solve your gardening problems, spend more time growing, and get the best harvest every year!

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