Self Pollinating Plum Trees (10 Plum Varieties That Self Pollinate)


There are some plum trees that require another tree nearby to pollinate flowers produce fruit.  However, other plum trees are self-pollinating and these ones produce fruit all by themselves.

So, which plum trees are self-pollinating?  Some self-pollinating plum trees include: Au-Roadside, Beauty, Damson, Green Gage, Methley, Mount Royal, Persian Green, Plum Burgundy, Santa Rosa, and Stanley.

Of course, planting additional plum trees nearby can increase the size of your harvest.  You can also plant some different plum varieties trees to get a longer window for harvesting fresh plums.

In this article, we’ll give a list of 10 self-pollinating plum trees, along with some information about each variety.

Let’s get started.

10 Self-Pollinating Plum Varieties

Some varieties of plum (Pyrus domestica) are self-pollinating.  This means that you only need that one tree to produce fruit.

red plums
Some plum varieties are self-pollinating, which means they do not need another tree nearby to produce fruit.

Plum trees generally produce fruit 3 to 6 years after planting (2 to 5 years for dwarf plum varieties).

Here are some self-pollinating plum varieties to consider for your garden:

  • Au-Roadside Plum – this self-pollinating plum variety is a standard size, reaching a height of 20 to 25 feet and a width of 20 feet.  It produces white flowers and dark red fruit with amber flesh.  It can yield up to 120 pounds of semi-clingstone fruit.  The tree is resistant to black knot, bacterial canker, bacterial fruit spot, and plum leaf scald.  It is adapted to Zones 6 to 8.  You can learn more about the Au-Roadside Plum from Gurney’s.
  • Beauty Plum – this self-pollinating plum variety is a good pollinator for other plum trees.  The tree is a standard size, reaching a height of 12 to 15 feet and a width of 12 to 15 feet.  It produces white or pale pink flowers and bright red fruit with amber flesh.  It yields clingstone fruit in early June.  It is adapted to Zones 6 to 9.  You can learn more about the Beauty Plum from Gurney’s.
  • Damson Plum – this self-pollinating plum variety comes from Shropshire, England.  The tree comes in two sizes: standard (reaching a height of 18 to 20 feet and a width of 18 to 20 feet) or dwarf (reaching a height of 8 to 10 feet and a width of 8 to 10 feet).  It produces white flowers and small to medium purple fruit in August.  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 7.  You can learn more about the Damson Plum from Stark Brothers.
damson plums on tree
Damson plums produce small to medium purple fruit in August, and the trees can survive in Zones 5 to 7.
  • Green Gage Plum – this self-pollinating plum variety is a standard size, reaching a height of 20 to 25 feet and a width of 20 to 25 feet.  It produces white flowers and yellow-green fruit.  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 9.  You can learn more about the Green Gage Plum from Gurney’s.
green gage plums
Green Gage plums produce yellow-green fruit, and the trees can survive in Zones 5 to 9.
  • Methley Plum – this self-pollinating plum variety comes from South Africa and is good for pollinating other Japanese plum varieties.  The tree is standard size, reaching a height of 18 to 20 feet and a width of 18 to 20 feet.  It produces white flowers and medium purple-red fruit in mid-July.  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 9.  You can learn more about the Methley Plum from Stark Brothers.
  • Mount Royal Plum – this self-pollinating prune plum variety comes from Canada.  The tree is standard size, reaching a height of 18 to 20 feet and a width of 18 to 20 feet.  It produces white flowers and small to medium blue fruit in August.  It is adapted to Zones 4 to 8.  You can learn more about the Mount Royal Plum from Stark Brothers.
  • Persian Green Plum – this self-pollinating plum variety is a standard size, reaching a height of 12 to 15 feet and a width of 12 to 15 feet.  It produces white flowers and sour green fruit with yellow flesh.  It yields fruit in late April or May.  It is adapted to Zones 6 to 9.  You can learn more about the Persian Green Plum from Gurney’s.
  • Plum Burgundy – this self-pollinating plum variety is a standard size, reaching a height of 20 to 25 feet and a width of 20 feet.  It produces white flowers and dark reddish purple fruit with pinkish purple flesh.  It yields semi-freestone fruit with a small pit in early July.  It is adapted to Zones 6 to 10.  You can learn more about the Plum Burgundy from Gurney’s.
  • Santa Rosa Plum – this self-pollinating plum variety was developed by Luther Burbank in Santa Rosa, California.  The tree is heat-tolerant and comes in two sizes: standard (reaching a height of 18 to 20 feet and a width of 18 to 20 feet) or dwarf (reaching a height of 8 to 10 feet and a width of 8 to 10 feet).  It produces white flowers and large red clingstone fruit in July.  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 9.  You can learn more about the Santa Rosa Plum from Stark Brothers.
santa rosa plums on tree
Santa Rosa plums produce large red clingstone fruit in July, and the trees can survive in Zones 5 to 9.
  • Stanley Prune Plum – this self-pollinating prune plum variety was developed in Geneva, New York by Cornell University.  The tree is standard size, reaching a height of 18 to 20 feet and a width of 18 to 20 feet.  It produces white flowers and medium purple freestone fruit in early September.  It is adapted to Zones 5 to 7.  You can learn more about the Stanley Plum from Stark Brothers.
stanley plums
Stanley prune plums produce medium purple freestone fruit in early September, and the trees can survive in Zones 5 to 7.

Remember that all of the plum varieties above are self-pollinating.  You don’t need another tree to produce fruit.

However, having two or more trees of different varieties close together may improve your harvest.

Conclusion

Now you know a little more about self-pollinating plum trees.  You also know how to choose different types to get fresh fruit for a longer time.

I hope you found this article helpful.  If so, please share it with someone who can use the information.

If you want to read some of my most popular posts, check out the “Best of GreenUpSide” page here.  Enjoy!

~Jonathon

jonathon.david.madore

Hi, I'm Jon. Let's solve your gardening problems, spend more time growing, and get the best harvest every year!

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