Top 14 Blight Resistant Tomato Varieties (Plus 7 Ways To Prevent Blight)


If you often get early blight or late blight on your tomato plants, you know how frustrating it is to lose fruit, plants, or an entire season’s work to these diseases. Luckily, there are some blight resistant tomato varieties you can choose from to prevent this problem in your garden.

So, which tomatoes are blight resistant? The Mountain Magic, Plum Regal, Defiant PhR, Jasper, Matt’s Wild Cherry, Juliet, Nectar, Cloudy Day, & Stellar tomato varieties resist both early blight & late blight. The Red Pearl, Red Grape, & Legend tomato varieties resist late blight. The Verona & Valentine tomato varieties resist early blight.

Of course, there are other blight resistant tomato varieties out there, but this list of 14 should give you a good start. Remember that late blight is more deadly to tomato plants than early blight.

In this article, we’ll take a closer look at my picks for 14 blight resistant tomato varieties.  We will also go over 7 key steps you can take to prevent tomato blight in your garden.

Let’s get started.

Top 14 Blight Resistant Tomatoes

Below is the list of 14 blight resistant tomatoes with more information about plant height, fruit size, and time to maturity.

ripe tomatoes on vine
It is a little more work to find blight-resistant tomato varieties, but it is worth it to avoid the problem of blight.

Note:

  • The first 9 varieties on the list are “double resistant”, meaning that they resist both early blight and late blight.
  • The 10th, 11th, and 12th varieties on the list are only resistant to late blight (the more dangerous of the two types of blight.)
  • The 13th and 14th varieties on the list are only resistant to early blight.

Here is the list:

  1. Mountain Magic Hybrid Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to both early and late blight.  The plants are indeterminate, with a spread of 48 to 52 inches.  The fruit weighs 2 to 3 ounces, maturing in 70 to 80 days.  For more information, check out the Mountain Magic Hybrid Tomato on the Burpee website.
  2. Plum Regal Hybrid Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to both early and late blight.  The plants are determinate.  The fruit weighs 4 ounces, maturing in 75 days.  For more information, check out the Plum Regal Hybrid Tomato on the Johnny’s Selected Seeds website.
  3. Defiant PhR Hybrid Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to both early and late blight.  The plants are determinate.  The fruit weighs 6 to 8 ounces, maturing in 67 days.  For more information, check out the Defiant PhR Hybrid Tomato on the Johnny’s Selected Seeds website.
  4. Jasper Hybrid Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to both early and late blight.  The plants are indeterminate.  The fruit weighs 7 to 10 grams (less than 1 ounce), maturing in 60 days.  For more information, check out the Jasper Hybrid Tomato on the Johnny’s Selected Seeds website.
  5. Matt’s Wild Cherry Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to both early and late blight.  The plants are indeterminate.  The fruit weighs 5 grams (less than 1 ounce), maturing in 60 days.  For more information, check out Matt’s Wild Cherry Tomato on the Johnny’s Selected Seeds website.
  6. Juliet Hybrid Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to both early and late blight.  The plants are indeterminate.  The fruit weighs 1.5 to 2 ounces, maturing in 60 days.  For more information, check out the Juliet Hybrid Tomato on the Johnny’s Selected Seeds website.
  7. Nectar Hybrid Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to both early and late blight.  The plants are indeterminate, with a spread of 24 inches.  The fruit is small and red, maturing in 65 days.  For more information, check out the Nectar Hybrid Tomato on the Park Seed website.
  8. Cloudy Day Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to both early and late blight. The plants are indeterminate, yet compact, reaching a height and width of only 3 to 4 feet. The fruit is glossy red and weighs 4 to 5 ounces. For more information, check out the Cloudy Day Tomato on the Burpee website.
  9. Stellar Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to both early and late blight. The plants are determinate, reaching a height of only 3 feet. The round, bright red fruit weighs 5 to 7 ounces. For more information, check out the Stellar Tomato on the Seeds N’ Such website.
  10. Red Pearl Hybrid Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to late blight.  The plants are indeterminate.  The fruit weighs 15 to 20 grams (less than 1 ounce), maturing in 58 days.  For more information, check out the Red Pearl Hybrid Tomato on the Johnny’s Selected Seeds website.
  11. Red Grape Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to late blight. The plants are indeterminate. The shiny, red fruit comes in grape-sized clusters, with each one weighing about 2 ounces and maturing in 70 days. For more information, check out the Red Grape Tomato on the Harris Seeds website.
  12. Legend Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to late blight. The plants are determinate. The glossy, red fruit weighs in at an impressive 8 ounces after maturing in 68 days. For more information, check out the Legend Tomato on the Seeds N’ Such website.
  13. Verona Hybrid Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to early blight.  The plants are indeterminate.  The fruit weighs 2.5 ounces, maturing in 69 days.  For more information, check out the Verona Hybrid Tomato on the Johnny’s Selected Seeds website.
  14. Valentine Hybrid Tomato – this tomato variety is resistant to early blight.  The plants are indeterminate.  The fruit is small, red, and oval-shaped, maturing in 55 days.  For more information, check out the Valentine Hybrid Tomato on the Harris Seeds website.

The following table gives a summary version of the information above. Note:

  • For “DR” (disease resistance), E means early blight resistant, L means late blight resistant, and EL means resistant to both types of blight.
  • For “Habit”, D means determinate (not as tall) and I means indeterminate (tall).
  • The “WT” (fruit weight) is in ounces.
  • DTM stands for days to maturity (the time it takes from transplant to mature fruit harvest).
TypeDRHabitWTDTM
Mountain
Magic
E&LI2-370-
80
Plum
Regal
E&LD475
Defiant
PhR
E&LD6-867
JasperE&LI<160
Matt’s
Wild
Cherry
E&LI<160
JulietE&LI1-260
NectarE&LI<165
Cloudy
Day
E&LI4-570
StellarE&LD5-773
Red
Pearl
LI<158
Red
Grape
LI270
LegendLD868
VeronaEI2.569
ValentineEI<155
This table summarizes information on 10 types
of blight resistant hybrid tomato varieties.

As you can see, many of these blight resistant tomato varieties are small, weighing 2 ounces or less. However, there are some varieties with medium fruit size (4 to 5 ounces or more).

If you like to experiment by crossing plants, you can also look into grafting tomato plants to provide them with more disease resistance.

How To Prevent Tomato Blight

Now that we have a list of blight-resistant tomato varieties to choose from, let’s review some other steps you can take to avoid these dreadful tomato diseases.

First, it is important to keep in mind the two types of blight that can affect tomatoes: early blight and late blight (both caused by different types of fungus).

Early blight (caused by one of the two fungi Alternaria tomatophila or Alternaria solani) can weaken tomato plants and affect your harvest.  It spreads more rapidly in damp, humid conditions.

early blight on tomato leaf
Here we can see signs of early blight on tomato leaves.

Late blight (caused by the fungus Phytophthora infestans) can kill a tomato plant within a few days of infection.  Left unchecked, a late blight outbreak can destroy your entire tomato crop.  It spreads more rapidly in cool, wet conditions.

late blight on tomato stem
Here we can see signs of late blight on a tomato stem. Late blight is the more deadly of the two blights for tomato plants.

Even worse, early and late blight can also affect potatoes, posing a threat to your potato crop as well.  In fact, late blight was responsible for the Irish Potato Famine in the 1840’s.

potato late blight
Here we see a potato affected by late blight.

For more information on blight resistant tomatoes, check out this article from the Cooperative Extension (eorganic.org) on late blight management.

You can also check out this article on early blight from the University of Minnesota Extension.

If you want more information on how tomato plants get blight in the first place, check out my article on how tomato plants get blight.

Now let’s get to the ways you can prevent blight in the first place, whether you plant blight-resistant tomato varieties or not.

Leave Enough Space Between Your Tomato Plants

If you put your tomato plants too close together, their leaves will touch as their branches grow longer.  This makes it easier for early and late blight to spread between plants – possibly making their way up an entire row!

Putting plants too close together also increases the chance that splashing water (from rain or irrigation) will cover the leaves of multiple plants with infected soil.

dying tomato plant
If you put your tomato plants too close together, the spread of diseases such as blight is more likely.

Fortunately, there is an easy way to prevent these problems.

When ordering tomato seeds or seedlings, check the width (spread) of the variety you choose. If the catalog doesn’t list the information, call or email to ask about it.

For example, Burpee lists the spread for Mountain Magic tomatoes at 48 to 52 inches (over 4 feet). However, you might want to leave a little more space between each plant than the width indicates.

For example, if the catalog lists a tomato variety as having a width of 48 to 52 inches, you might want to leave 55 to 60 inches between plants, just to be safe.

Leave at least as much space between rows of tomato plants. This will give you room to water, fertilize, harvest, pull weeds, and prune your tomato leaves and vines during the season.

Use Crop Rotation In Your Garden

Early blight can survive in the soil on its own over the winter, which makes it the more difficult disease to eradicate.

On the other hand, late blight cannot survive in the soil on its own over the winter. However, it can survive inside of infected plant matter (such as potato tubers).

This means that you should use crop rotation in your garden to prevent the spread of blight.  Crop rotation means you do not plant the same crop type in the same part of your garden two years in a row.

tomato plant
Be sure to practice crop rotation to prevent the spread of blight. Do not plant tomatoes in the same spot in your garden two years in a row!

In fact, the ideal crop rotation schedule has a 3 or 4 year rotation cycle.  For example, in a given area:

  • Plant tomatoes in year 1
  • Plant onions in year 2
  • Plant beans in year 3
  • Plant lettuce in year 4
tiny tomato plants picture
Rotate tomatoes with other crops in your garden to avoid the spread of disease from year to year.

After that, start back at the beginning and begin the rotation again.  This allows more time for any plant diseases (such as blight) to die off from the soil.

You can learn more about good crops to rotate with tomatoes in my article here.

As mentioned earlier, early and late blight can affect both tomatoes and potatoes (both are in the nightshade family). So, these two crops should not be planted near each other.

They also should not be planted in the same area two years in a row (that is, do not plant tomatoes in an area the first year and then potatoes in the same area the 2nd year). Otherwise, tomato blight may soon manifest as potato blight, or vice versa.

Support Your Tomato Plants

When tomato plants touch each other, blight and other diseases spread more easily.  Your plants are likely to touch if they grow along the ground, as unsupported tomatoes will do.

Growing tomato plants along the ground also means that the stems and leaves are in contact with wet soil.  This increases the chances of disease spreading in your garden.

To prevent this, support your tomato plants with trellises, stakes, or tomato cages.

For determinate tomato varieties (which tend to be shorter), cages are a good choice. (Cages can also be used for pepper plants to provide support.)

For indeterminate tomato varieties (which tend to be taller), a stake or trellis is the better choice.

plant cage
For shorter, determinate tomato varieties, a tomato cage is a good choice for support.

Supporting your tomato plants will help to prevent disease. It also saves you from having to bend over to harvest tomatoes from the ground.

tomato stakes
For indeterminate tomato varieties, stakes (shown here) or trellises are a better choice for support.

For more information, check out my article on tomato cages, my article on trellises, and my article on supporting tomatoes.

Remember that if you choose stakes, you will need to tie the tomato plants somehow. You can learn more about what to use for tying tomatoes in my article here.

Inspect Your Tomato Plants For Disease

Don’t leave anything to chance!  Even if you choose blight-resistant tomato varieties and take the other steps on this list, you should still check your tomato plants for disease.

tomato early blight
If you see plants with signs of blight, remove them from the garden to prevent the spread of the disease.

The sooner you find tomato plants infected with blight, the sooner you can pull them out, destroy them, and prevent the spread of the disease.

Some folks recommend composting infected plants, but I recommend against it.  The main reason is that the compost pile may not get hot enough to kill diseases – and many diseases can survive the winter in a compost pile.

Prune The Lower Leaves & Branches Of Your Tomato Plants

The lower leaves and branches of your tomato plants are more likely to get wet due to splashing from rain or watering.  They are also more likely to stay wet, since less sunlight will reach them to dry them off.

The lower leaves and branches are also more likely to hang down and touch the soil, where they can pick up diseases.

pruning shears
Pruning the lower leaves and branches of your tomato plants prevents the spread of blight.

To prevent this problem, your best bet is to prune off low-hanging leaves and branches from your tomato plants as they grow.  At first, it might seem silly to do this to a healthy branch or leaf.

However, if it prevents the spread of blight, then it is worthwhile to save your plant (or your entire tomato harvest!)

While you’re at it, you can also “top” tomato plants by pruning off the tops of tall indeterminate varieties. This will keep them from falling over due to excessive height or weight.

For more information, check out my article on tall tomato plants and how to prune them.

Water Your Tomato Plants From Below

Watering tomato plants from below will keep the upper and lower leaves from getting wet.  Keeping the leaves dry is an important step in preventing the spread of both early and late blight (both thrive in damp conditions).

garden hose
Water your plants carefully from below, using a hose or watering can, to prevent the leaves from getting wet.

Instead of using a sprinkler, use a garden hose or a watering can to control the amount and location of the water you give your plants.

You can also install a drip irrigation system. This will water at the soil level so that the leaves will never get wet.

You can also set up a drip irrigation system to run on a timer. This will help you to avoid over watering.

Sanitize Your Garden Tools

Since early blight can survive in soil on its own over the winter, it is a good idea to sanitize garden tools after using them.

For example, have a bucket of soapy water or a rag with alcohol to clean off pruning shears after you finish pruning each plant.

5 gallon bucket
Sanitize your garden tools after use – alcohol or soapy water will help to get rid of diseases.

Otherwise, if the first plant has blight, you can potentially infect every other tomato plant in your garden!

Conclusion

Now you have a solid list of 10 blight-resistant tomato varieties to choose from.  You also have some actionable advice about how to avoid early blight and late blight in the first place.

Bacterial wilt of tomatoes is often mistaken for blight. You can learn more about bacterial wilt of tomato in my article here.

You can also learn about other causes of curled leaves on tomatoes in my article here.

I hope you found this article helpful – if so, please share it with someone else who can use the information.

If you want to read some of my most popular posts, check out the “Best of GreenUpSide” page here.  Enjoy!

~Jonathon

jonathon.david.madore

Hi, I'm Jon. Let's solve your gardening problems, spend more time growing, and get the best harvest every year!

Recent Posts