Houseplants With Purple Flowers (10 Varieties To Try)


Houseplants can bring lots of joy into your life, and some can also add style with their colorful foliage and flowers.  Certain houseplants produce flowers for part of the year, and you can find lots of colors, including the regal and majestic purple.

So, which houseplants have purple flowers?  Houseplants with purple flowers include African Violet, Annual Vinca, Blue Ginger, Chirita, Lipstick Plant, Persian Shield, Petrocosmea, Purple Heart, and Sinningia.  Some of these plants also have purple leaves, and some of them produce flowers with colors other than purple.

Of course, some of these plants can be kept outdoors in warmer climates.  The plants you choose will depend on where you live and how much care you can give them.

In this article, we’ll talk about 10 interesting houseplants with purple flowers.  We’ll also get into the details of their preferences in terms of light, water, and other important growth factors.

Let’s begin.

Houseplants With Purple Flowers

There are lots of houseplants with purple flowers for you to find, but here is a list of 10 to get you started:

  • African Violet
  • Annual Vinca
  • Blue Ginger
  • Chirita
  • Lipstick Plant
  • Orchid
  • Persian Shield
  • Petrocosmea
  • Purple Heart
  • Sinningia
African Violet flowers
You have lots of options when choosing a houseplant with purple flowers.

Let’s start off with a classic and beloved houseplant: the African Violet.

African Violet

African violet (Streptocarpus) is a houseplant that produces lavender, violet, or deep purple flowers.  These flowers will continue to bloom if the plant gets 14-16 hours of sunlight per day (it also needs 8 to 10 hours of darkness.)

African Violet flowers can also come in the following colors:

  • White
  • Pink
  • Maroon
  • Blue

The leaves of an African Violet are fuzzy and round or heart-shaped.  They have a silver-green, light green, or dark green color.

African Violet plant with flower
African Violet has deep purple flowers and fuzzy green leaves.

The plant is compact, and may only grow to a height of 6 inches.  According to the University of Minnesota Extension, African Violets come in the following sizes:

  • Miniature – width under 8 inches
  • Standard – width 8 to 16 inches
  • Large – width over 16 inches

African Violet needs moderate moisture levels.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

This plant prefers partial shade, but it still needs plenty of light.  According to the Old Farmer’s Almanac, the leaves will turn dark green with too little light, and light green with too much light.

The best temperature for African Violet is 60 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit (16 to 27 degrees Celsius).  The ideal temperature is 70 degrees Fahrenheit (21 degrees Celsius).

Humidity levels at 40% to 60% are best for this plant.  It likes soilless, well-drained potting mix with a pH of 6.2 to 6.5 (slightly acidic).

You can propagate African Violet by offsets, division, or by leaf cuttings.

You can learn more about African Violet from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

Annual Vinca

Annual Vinca (Catharantus) is a houseplant that produces 2 to 3 inch purple flowers with a red, pink, or white “eye” in the center.  The flowers can appear in spring through fall until frost comes.

Annual Vinca minor
Annual VInca produces purple flowers with a red, pink, or white “eye” in the center.

Other varieties also have the following flower colors:

  • Light Blue
  • Pink
  • Salmon
  • Apricot
  • Raspberry
  • Burgundy

The leaves of Annual Vinca are glossy and evergreen.  The plant is compact, growing to a height of only 10 to 14 inches with a width of 6 to 8 inches.

Annual Vinca needs moderate moisture levels.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

It likes full sun, but can survive in partial shade.  According to the Iowa State University Extension, Annual Vinca resists both heat and drought.

As an outdoor plant, it is hardy to Zone 11.

You can learn more about Annual Vinca from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

Blue Ginger

Blue Ginger (Dichorisandra thyrsiflora) is a houseplant that produces 1 to 2 inch purple or blue flowers in late summer to early fall.

Blue Ginger flowers
Blue Ginger produces purple or blue flowers in late summer to early fall.
Image courtesy of:
DarwIn via:
Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:
Blue_Ginger_(172202207).jpeg

The leaves are evergreen.  The plant can reach a height of 6 to 8 feet, with a width of 3 to 4 feet.

Blue Ginger prefers moderate to wet moisture levels.   Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

It tolerates humidity and prefers partial or dappled shade.  You can propagate Blue Ginger by division or by stem cuttings.

Blue Ginger can be grown outdoors as an evergreen in warmer climates (such as parts of Florida).

You can learn more about Blue Ginger from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

Chirita

Chirita (Chirita walkerae) is a houseplant that produces 1 to 2 inch purple flowers.

Chirita walkerae flower
Chirita walkerae produces 1 to 2 inch purple flowers.

The leaves are evergreen.  The plant is compact, only reaching a height of 6 to 8 inches with a width of 8 to 12 inches.

Chirita prefers moderate moisture levels.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

It tolerates humidity and likes full sun, but can survive in partial shade.  It prefers warm temperatures and a slightly acidic to neutral pH (6.1 to 7.3).

You can propagate Chirita by division or by stem cuttings in spring or summer.

You can learn more about Chirita from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

Lipstick Plant

Lipstick Plant (Aeschynanthus bracteatus or Aeschynanthus radicans) is a houseplant that produces small (under 1 inch) red and purple flowers (shaped like tubes) from late spring through early fall.

Lipstick Plant flowers
A Lipstick Plant produces purple and red tube-shaped flowers.
Image courtesy of: Mokkie
via: Wikimedia Commons:
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:
Lipstick_Plant_(Aeschynanthus_
radicans)_red_1.jpg

The leaves are evergreen, leathery, and smooth.  The plant only grows 4 to 6 inches tall, but can trail 2 to 4 feet (it is often grown as a hanging plant).

Lipstick Plant prefers moderate moisture levels.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

It tolerates humidity and likes full sun, but can survive in partial shade.  It is a tropical plant, so it prefers warm temperatures and a slightly acidic to neutral pH (6.1 to 7.3).

According to the North Carolina State University Extension, the best temperature for Lipstick Plant is 65 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit (18 to 21 degrees Celsius).  It will drop its leaves if temperatures fall below 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius).

As an outdoor plant, it is hardy in Zones 10a through 11b.

You can propagate Lipstick Plant by stem cuttings.  The plant is epiphytic, meaning that it grows by climbing up other plants and using them for support.

You can learn more about Lipstick Plant from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

Orchid

Orchid (Dendrobium nobile) is a houseplant that produces 2 to 3 inch purple, pink, lavender, or white flowers in late winter to early spring.

Orchid Dendrobium
Orchids can produce purple, pink, lavender, or white flowers.

The leaves are stiff and bright green.

Orchids prefer moderate moisture levels.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

It tolerates humidity and likes full sun, but can survive in partial shade.

You can propagate Orchids by offsets.  The plant is epiphytic, meaning that it grows by climbing up other plants and using them for support.

You can learn more about Orchids from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

Persian Shield

Persian Shield (Strobilanthes) is a houseplant that produces small (under 1 inch) purple, blue, pink, or white flowers.

Persian Shield
Persian Shield has purple leaves and produces purple flowers.
Image courtesy of:
FlickrLickr via: Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:
Persian_Shield_Night.jpg

The leaves (which can grow 6 to 8 inches long) are evergreen and broad, with green, silver, and purple shades.  The plant grows 12 to 36 inches tall with a width of 18 to 23 inches.

Persian Shield tolerates humidity and likes full sun, but can survive in partial shade.  The plant requires excellent drainage when kept in pots as a houseplant.

According to the University of Wisconsin-Madison Extension, it is only hardy up to Zone 10.  It prefers warm temperatures, so dig it up and bring it indoors for the winter if you live in a cold climate.

You can propagate Persian Shield by stem cuttings.

You can learn more about Persian Shield from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

Petrocosmea

Petrocosmea (Petrocosmea minor) is a houseplant that produces small (under 1 inch) purple flowers in summer to early fall.

Petrocosmea
Image courtesy of:
Averater via:
WIkimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:
Petrocosmea_flaccida_
GotBot_2015_001.jpg

The leaves are evergreen.  The plant grows 3 to 4 inches tall.

Petrocosmea prefers moderate moisture levels.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

The plant requires excellent drainage when kept in pots as a houseplant.

It prefers slightly acidic to slightly alkaline soil (pH of 6.1 to 7.8).  In nature, it often grows on wet, mossy rocks.

You can propagate Petrocosmea by leaf cuttings.

You can learn more about Petrocosmea from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

Purple Heart

Purple Heart (Tradescantia pallida) is a houseplant that produces small (under 1 inch) purple or pink flowers year round.

Purple Heart flower
Purple Heart produces small purple or pink flowers.
Image courtesy of:
SKsiddhartthan via:
Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Purple_heart_flower.jpg

The leaves (up to 7 inches long) are evergreen, with a purple color to match the flowers.  The plant itself grows 12 to 18 inches tall, with a width of 18 inches.

Purple Heart prefers moderate moisture levels.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

Purple Heart tolerates humidity and drought, and likes full sun, but it can survive in partial shade.  The plant requires excellent drainage when kept in pots as a houseplant.

It can also be kept as a hanging plant.  You can propagate Purple Heart by stem cuttings, tip cuttings, layering, or seed pods.

According to the University of Wisconsin-Madison Extension, Purple Heart is hardy in Zones 7 to 10, but should be kept as a houseplant in colder climates.

You can learn more about Purple Heart from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

Sinningia

Sinningia is a houseplant that produces small (under 1 inch) purple and white tube-shaped flowers in late spring to summer.  It grows 12 to 24 inches tall with a width of 12 to 18 inches.

Sinningia flowers
Sinningia produces small purple and white tube-shaped flowers.
Image courtesy of:
Christer T Johansson via: Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sinningia_speciosa-IMG_0661.JPG

Sinningia prefers moderate moisture levels.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

Sinningia tolerates humidity and likes full sun, but it can survive in partial shade.  The plant requires excellent drainage when kept in pots as a houseplant.

You can propagate Sinningia by stem cuttings.

You can learn more about Sinningia from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

Conclusion

Now you know about 10 interesting houseplants with purple flowers that you can try growing at home.

If your house gets cold in the winter, check out my article on cold tolerant houseplants.

For outdoor landscaping and curb appeal, check out these ground cover plants with purple flowers and these vines with purple flowers. You might also want to read my article on trees with purple flowers.

You might also be interested in reading my article on 10 brilliant houseplants with yellow flowers, article on houseplants with blue flowers, my article on houseplants with white flowers, or my article on 10 houseplants with dazzling orange flowers.

If you are interested in colorful foliage, check out my article on houseplants with pink leaves.

I hope you found this article helpful.  If so, please share it with someone who can use the information.

If you want to read some of my most popular posts, check out the “Best of GreenUpSide” page here.  Enjoy!

~Jonathon

jonathon.david.madore

Hi, I'm Jon. Let's solve your gardening problems, spend more time growing, and get the best harvest every year!

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