Plants For The Classroom (10 Plants For Students To Enjoy)


If you are looking for the perfect plants for your classroom, look no further.  I’ve created a list of 10 houseplants that have interesting features (and that can survive shade in a classroom, if necessary).

So, what are some plants for classrooms?  Plants for classrooms include: Aluminum Plant, Boston Fern, Coleus, English Ivy, Parlor Palm, Pothos, Snake Plant, Spider Plant, Split-Leaf Philodendron, and ZZ Plant.  Some of these plants have attractive foliage or flowers, some are succulents with low water needs, and others are climbing vines!

Of course, all of these plants can survive in partial or full shade, but most don’t mind if they get a little more sun in a bright window.

In this article, we’ll talk about 10 plants for classrooms.  We’ll also take a look at what they need for light, water, and other important growth factors.

Let’s get started.

10 Plants For Classrooms

There are plenty of plants that can thrive in a classroom, but here are 10 to start with:

  • Aluminum Plant
  • Boston Fern
  • Coleus
  • English Ivy
  • Parlor Palm
  • Pothos
  • Snake Plant
  • Spider Plant
  • Split-Leaf Philodendron
  • ZZ Plant

Let’s begin with Aluminum Plant.

Aluminum Plant

Aluminum Plant (Pilea cadierei) is a perennial herb that can be kept as a houseplant or in a classroom.  It produces tiny (less than 1 inch) green flowers in summer.

Aluminum Plant
Aluminum Plant is a perennial herb that would make a good addition to a classroom.

Aluminum Plant needs moderate moisture levels, and it tolerates humidity.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

Aluminum Plant likes partial or full shade.  It can tolerate slightly acidic to neutral soil (pH of 6.1 to 7.3).

Aluminum Plant cannot tolerate severe cold.  It is hardy to Zone 11 (as cold as 40 degrees Fahrenheit or 4 degrees Celsius).

This plant grows to a height of 8 to 12 inches, with a spread of 8 to 12 inches.

You can propagate Aluminum Plant by stem cuttings or leaf cuttings.

You can learn more about Aluminum Plant from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

You can find Aluminum Plant from Planterina.

Boston Fern

Boston Fern (Nephrolepis exaltata) is a perennial fern that can be kept as a houseplant or in a classroom.  It produces rhizomes (an underground structure) and has evergreen leaves.

Boston Fern
Boston Fern is a perennial fern that produces underground rhizomes and tolerates humidity. It is another good plant for classrooms.

Boston Fern needs moderate moisture levels, and it tolerates humidity.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

Boston Fern likes partial or full shade.  It can tolerate slightly acidic to slightly alkaline soil (pH of 6.1 to 7.8).

Boston Fern can tolerate some cold.  It is hardy to Zone 9a (as cold as 20 degrees Fahrenheit or 7 degrees Celsius).

This plant grows to a height of 2 to 3 feet, so it won’t get too big for a classroom.

You can propagate Boston Fern by division or by stolons & runners.

You can learn more about Boston Fern from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

You can find Boston Fern from Woodie’s Garden Goods.

Coleus

Coleus (Coleus scutellarioides) is a perennial herb that can be kept as a houseplant or in a classroom.  It has dazzling leaf colors, depending on the variety (cultivar) that you choose.

Coleus
Coleus is a perennial herb that has dazzling leaf colors, making it a perfect choice to add beauty to a classroom.

Coleus needs moderate moisture levels, and it tolerates humidity.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

Coleus likes partial or full shade.  It can tolerate slightly acidic to slightly alkaline soil (pH of 6.1 to 7.8).

Coleus can tolerate some cold (possibly a light frost): it is hardy to Zone 10a (as cold as 30 degrees Fahrenheit or -1 degrees Celsius).

This plant grows to a height of 1 to 2 feet and a width of 1 foot or less, so it won’t outgrow a small pot if kept in a classroom.

You can propagate Coleus by stem cuttings.

You can learn more about Coleus from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

You can find Coleus from Taylor Greenhouses.

English Ivy

English Ivy (Hedera helix) is a perennial vining shrub that can be kept as a houseplant or in a classroom.  It produces tiny (less than 1 inch) greenish white flowers in late summer, fall, or winter.

English Ivy
English Ivy is a perennial vining shrub that can climb and resist drought, making it an interesting plant to feature in a classroom.

English Ivy needs moderate or wet moisture levels, but resists drought.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

English Ivy tolerates partial or full shade, but it can survive in full sun.  It can tolerate moderately acidic to slightly alkaline soil (pH of 5.6 to 7.8).

English Ivy can tolerate severe cold.  It is hardy to Zone 4a (as cold as -30 degrees Fahrenheit or –34 degrees Celsius).

This plant grows to a height of 36 feet.

You can propagate English Ivy by layering, stem cuttings, tip cuttings, or by seeds.

You can learn more about English Ivy from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

You can find English Ivy from Calloway’s Nursery.

Parlor Palm

Parlor Palm (Chamaedorea elegans) is a tree that can be kept as a houseplant or in a classroom.  It produces tiny (less than 1 inch) green or yellow flowers in later winter or early spring (it can also produce fruit).

Parlor Palm
Parlor Palm is a tree that can grow up to 10 feet tall, so it might not be suitable for a classroom with low ceilings.

Parlor Palm prefers moderate moisture levels, and it tolerates both drought and humidity.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

Parlor Palm likes partial or full shade.  It can tolerate slightly acidic to slightly alkaline soil (pH of 6.1 to 7.8).

Parlor Palm can tolerate some cold (possibly a light frost): it is hardy to Zone 10a (as cold as 30 degrees Fahrenheit or -1 degrees Celsius).

This plant grows to a height of 2 to 10 feet and a width of 2 to 3 feet, so it may outgrow a small classroom if the ceilings are low.

You can propagate Parlor Palm by division.

You can learn more about Parlor Palm from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

You can find Parlor Palm from Planterina.

Pothos

Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) is an epiphytic drought tolerant perennial evergreen vine that can be kept as a houseplant or in the classroom.  It is native to the Society Islands of French Polynesia.

Pothos
Pothos is an epiphytic drought tolerant vine that can tolerate shade in a classroom.

Pothos needs moderate to dry moisture levels.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

Pothos likes partial or full shade.  It prefers slightly acidic soil (pH of 6.1 to 6.5).

Pothos cannot tolerate much cold.  As an outdoor plant, it is hardy to Zone 9b (as cold as 25 degrees Fahrenheit or -4 degrees Celsius).

This plant grows to a height of 6 feet indoors, and possibly more outdoors.

You can propagate Pothos by stem cuttings.

You can learn more about Pothos from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

You can find Pothos from Woodie’s Garden Goods.

Snake Plant

Snake Plant (Dracaena trifasciata, or previously Sansevieria trifasciata) is an evergreen drought tolerant perennial plant that works well for classrooms.  It produces white flowers in late spring or early summer, after which it produces no new leaves.

Snake Plant
Snake Plant is an evergreen plant that can tolerate drought, making it a good option for classrooms.

Snake Plant needs moderate to dry moisture levels.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

Snake Plant prefers partial or full shade.  It prefers acidic to alkaline soil (pH of 4.5 to 8.5).

Snake Plant cannot tolerate much cold.  As an outdoor plant, it is hardy to Zone 10a (as cold as 30 degrees Fahrenheit or –1 degree Celsius).

This plant grows to a height of 2 to 4 feet.

You can propagate Snake Plant by division, leaf cuttings, or stolons and runners.

You can learn more about Snake Plant from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

You can find Snake Plant from The Cactus King.

Spider Plant

Spider Plant (Chlorophytum comosum) is a perennial ground cover grass that produces tiny (less than 1 inch) white flowers in late spring or summer.  This makes it an interesting addition to your classroom.

spider plant
Spider Plant is a perennial grass that can produce tiny white flowers, adding some lively plant color to your classroom.

Spider Plant needs moderate moisture levels and can tolerate humidity.  Too much water will cause root rot and damage the plant.

Spider Plant is versatile and can survive light conditions from full sun to full shade.  It prefers acidic to neutral soil (pH of 6.0 to 7.2).

Spider Plant can tolerate some cold.  As an outdoor plant, it is hardy to Zone 8b (as cold as 15 degrees Fahrenheit or -9 degrees Celsius).

This plant can grow to a height of 12 to 14 inches.

You can propagate Spider Plant by division, offsets, or stolons and runners.

You can learn more about Spider Plant from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

You can find Spider Plant from Garden Goods Direct.

Split-Leaf Philodendron

Split-Leaf Philodendron (Monstera deliciosa) is also called Monstera or Swiss Cheese Plant, and it is an epiphytic perennial evergreen plant that produces showy white flowers.  It is native to tropical forests of Central and South America, but it can add beauty to any classroom.

Monstera leaves
Split-Leaf Philodendron, or Monstera, has holes in its leaves that occur naturally. It is native to tropical forests, but it can find its way into your classroom too!

Split Leaf Philodendron needs moderate moisture levels and tolerates humidity.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

Split Leaf Philodendron likes partial or full shade.  It prefers acidic to neutral soil (pH of 5.5 to 7.0).

Split Leaf Philodendron cannot tolerate much cold.  As an outdoor plant, it is hardy to Zone 10a (as cold as 30 degrees Fahrenheit or –1 degree Celsius).

This plant grows to a height of 75 feet or higher in nature!

You can propagate Split Leaf Philodendron by stem cuttings or air layering.

You can learn more about Split Leaf Philodendron from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

You can find Split Leaf Philodendron from Bloomscape.

You can also learn more about Split Leaf Philodendron in my article here, and Monstera Thai Constellation (which has interesting leaf coloring) in my article here.

ZZ Plant

ZZ Plant (Zamioculcas zamiifolia) is a perennial succulent that can be kept as a houseplant or in a classroom.  It produces small (2 to 3 inch) cream to brown flowers.

Zamioculcas
ZZ Plant is a perennial succulent that can tolerate drought and will make a wonderful addition to any classroom.

ZZ Plant prefers moderate to dry moisture levels, and it tolerates drought.  Too much water will cause root rot and eventually kill the plant.

ZZ Plant likes partial or full shade, although it can tolerate full sun.  It can tolerate slightly acidic soil (pH of 6.1 to 6.5).

ZZ Plant can tolerate some cold (possibly a heavy frost or freeze): it is hardy to Zone 9a (as cold as 20 degrees Fahrenheit or -7 degrees Celsius).

This plant grows to a height of 2 to 3 feet and a width of 2 to 3 feet, so it should have enough space in any classroom.

You can propagate ZZ Plant by stem cuttings or division.

You can learn more about ZZ Plant from the National Gardening Association’s Plant Database.

You can find ZZ Plant from Plantvine.

Conclusion

Now you know about 10 interesting plants for your classroom, along with how to take care of them.  They might provide inspiration to help you to brighten up your class and teach your students a little about plants.

You might also be interested in 10 cacti that you can keep as houseplants.

If you want less prickly plants, you can read about 10 climbing vine houseplants in my article here.

You might also want to check out my article on tall houseplants for your home (or apartment, or classroom).

I hope you found this article helpful.  If so, please share it with someone who can use the information.

If you want to read some of my most popular posts, check out the “Best of GreenUpSide” page here.  Enjoy!

~Jonathon

jonathon.david.madore

Hi, I'm Jon. Let's solve your gardening problems, spend more time growing, and get the best harvest every year!

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