How Much Does A Rototiller Weigh? (With Table & Examples)


A rototiller (or tiller) is ve vfcry useful for breaking ground in a new garden, or for loosening up compacted soil.  However, you may be wondering how heavy they are, so you can decide what you can handle.

So, how much does a rototiller weigh?  A small rototiller can weigh as little as 30 pounds, and a large rototiller can weigh over 200 pounds.  The weight of a rototiller will depend on its width, power, and tine location.

Of course, this large variation in weights can also vary with the quality of the machine construction – a lighter rototiller may not last as long or have as much power as a heavy machine.

How Much Does A Rototiller Weigh?

A small rototiller (tiller/cultivator combination) can weigh as little as 30 pounds.  A heavy rototiller, meant for breaking up a new garden and tearing through roots, can weigh 200 pounds or more.

rototiller
Rototiller weights can vary considerably. A smaller one like this might only weigh 30 pounds, but it will only till a narrow path on each pass.

When deciding on a rototiller, you will want to take weight into consideration, but also width, since that will determine how many times you need to go over your garden to till the soil completely.

Front-tine and mid-tine tillers tend to be light or medium weight machines.  They are great for breaking up soft soil or digging up weeds.

Rear-tine tillers tend to be the heaviest and most powerful machines of the three types.  They are the best choice for tilling new garden space that has never been worked before.

For more information, check out the tables below (U.S. and metric) that compares various types of rototillers: 3 each of front-tine, mid-tine, and rear-tine.  The tables have the weights (pounds and kilograms) and width (inches and centimeters) for each model.

RototillerTine
Type
Weight
(lb)
Till
Width
(in)
Scotts 16 in. 13.5 Amp
Corded Electric
Tiller/Cultivator
Front3016
Powermate 11 in. 150cc
Gas Front Tine Tiller
Front10521
Troy-Bilt Colt XP 24 in.
208 cc OHV Engine
Front-Tine
Forward-Rotating Gas
Tiller with Adjustable
Tilling Width and
Reverse Gear
Front14924
Merry Tiller Minnie
(12″/18″) 127cc Forward
Rotating Mid-Tine Tiller
Mid8812 min
18 max
Merry Tiller Suburban
(14″/26″/37″) 205cc
Forward Rotating
Mid-Tine Tiller
Mid12614 min
26 mid
37 max
Merry Tiller
International
(14″/26″/37″) 205cc
Forward Rotating
Mid-Tine Tiller
Mid14014 min
26 mid
37 max
Powermate 18 in
212 cc Gas 4-cycle Rear
Tine Tiller
Rear15418
Troy-Bilt Super Bronco
16 in. 208 cc OHV
Engine Rear-Tine
Counter-Rotating Gas
Tiller with One Hand
Operation and
PowerReverse
Rear17516
Yardmax 18 in 208 cc
Dual Rotating Rear
TineTiller
Briggs & Stratton
Rear20518
RototillerTine
Type
Weight
(kg)
Till
Width
(cm)
Scotts 16 in. 13.5 Amp
Corded Electric
Tiller/Cultivator
Front13.641
Powermate 11 in. 150cc
Gas Front Tine Tiller
Front47.653
Troy-Bilt Colt XP 24 in.
208 cc OHV Engine
Front-Tine
Forward-Rotating Gas
Tiller with Adjustable
Tilling Width and
Reverse Gear
Front67.661
Merry Tiller Minnie
(12″/18″) 127cc Forward
Rotating Mid-Tine Tiller
Mid39.931 min
46 max
Merry Tiller Suburban
(14″/26″/37″) 205cc
Forward Rotating
Mid-Tine Tiller
Mid57.136 min
66 mid
94 max
Merry Tiller
International
(14″/26″/37″) 205cc
Forward Rotating
Mid-Tine Tiller
Mid63.536 min
66 mid
94 max
Powermate 18 in
212 cc Gas 4-cycle Rear
Tine Tiller
Rear69.846
Troy-Bilt Super Bronco
16 in. 208 cc OHV
Engine Rear-Tine
Counter-Rotating Gas
Tiller with One Hand
Operation and
PowerReverse
Rear79.441
Yardmax 18 in 208 cc
Dual Rotating Rear
TineTiller
Briggs & Stratton
Rear93.046

As you can imagine, there are some differences between the three types of tillers (front-tine, mid-tine, and rear-tine), including machine weight, tilling width, tilling depth, and method of operation.

Front-Tine Tillers

Front-tine tillers have the tines (metal teeth) at the front of the machine (farthest away from the operator).  These tines rotate forward, in the same direction as the wheels.

front tine tiller
A front-tine tiller has the tines (metal teeth) at the front of the machine, furthest from the operator.

Front-tine tillers often do not dig as deep or as powerfully as rear-tine tillers, and are most useful for loosening up soil for aeration and uprooting weeds.

Front-tine tillers often have two or three adjustable width settings.  This lets you cut a narrow width to get between obstacles in your garden, and also cut a wide path when there is nothing in the way.

How Much Does A Front-Tine Tiller Weigh?

A front-tine tiller weighs between 30 and 150 pounds.  The heavier tillers cut a wider path through the soil, and so the machines are larger and heavier.

For a small garden, a small corded electric tiller can do the work you need.  The light weight makes such a tiller easy to handle.

Also, the cord means you don’t have to worry about buying, transporting, or spilling gasoline.

For larger gardens, you might want to use a wider tiller (24 inches) that can do the same work in less time.  These machines need gas but are more powerful than corded electric tillers.

For more information, check out the front-tine tillers in the table at the beginning of the article.

How Deep Can A Front-Tine Tiller Dig?

A front-tine tiller can dig as deep as 7 to 8 inches (18 to 20 centimeters) into the soil.  Of course, lighter machines will not be able to cut through large roots from trees or shrubs.  Keep this in mind if there are any trees near your garden.

For the most part, you will want to use a front-tine tiller on gardens where the soil has already been tilled.  They are not the best choice for tilling and turning up new ground.

Instead, they should be used to loosen and aerate soil, to pull up weeds, or to till green manure under the soil.

For more information, check out my article on green manure (cover crops).

Mid-Tine Tillers

Mid-tine tillers have the tines are located under the engine of the machine.  These tines rotate forward, in the same direction as the wheels of the machine.

mid tine tiller
A mid-tine tiller has the tines directly underneath the engine.

Mid-tine tillers often do not dig as deep or as powerfully as rear-tine tillers, but they can dig deeper than front-tine tillers.  They are useful for loosening up soil for aeration and uprooting weeds, but also for preparing soil for growing deep-rooted plants.

Mid-tine tillers often have two or three adjustable width settings.  This lets you cut a narrow width to get between obstacles in your garden, and also cut a wide path when there is nothing in the way.

How Much Does A Mid-Tine Tiller Weigh?

A mid-tine tiller weighs between 80 and 140 pounds.  The heavier tillers cut a wider path through the soil, and so the machines are larger and heavier.

For a small garden, a small mid-tine tiller with an adjustable tine width (12 to 18 inches) can do the work you need in a short time.  The lighter weight makes such a tiller easier to handle.

For larger gardens, you might want to use a wider tiller (tine width of 3 feet or more) that can do the same work in less time.  The only downside is that these machines can be twice as heavy as tillers with less width, and so they are more difficult to maneuver in the garden.

For more information, check out the mid-tine tillers in the table at the beginning of the article.

How Deep Can A Mid-Tine Tiller Dig?

A mid-tine tiller can dig as deep as 8 to 12 inches (20 to 30 centimeters) into the soil.  Of course, lighter machines will not be able to cut through large roots from trees or shrubs.  Keep this in mind if there are any trees near your garden.

For the most part, you will want to use a mid-tine tiller on gardens where the soil has already been tilled.  They are not the best choice for tilling and turning up new ground.

Rear-Tine Tillers

Rear-tine tillers have tines that are located at the rear of the machine (near the operator).  These tines rotate backwards, in the opposite direction of the wheels.

rototiller
A rear-tine tiller has tines behind the engine, closest to the operator.

Rear-tine tillers are the most heavy duty machines you can buy, and they can dig deeper with more power than front-tine or mid-tine tillers.  They are useful for breaking new ground if you have never gardened before.

Many are also strong enough to break through roots, although you should still avoid large rocks, which can damage the machine.

Rear-tine tillers often have two or three adjustable width settings.  This lets you cut a narrow width to get between obstacles in your garden, and also cut a wide path when there is nothing in the way.

How Much Does A Rear-Tine Tiller Weigh?

A rear-tine tiller weighs between 150 and 200 pounds or more.  The heavier tillers cut a wider path through the soil, and so the machines are larger and heavier.

For breaking ground in a small garden, a small rear-tine tiller with a tine width of 16 to 18 inches can do the work you need in a short time.  These tillers are still hard to handle if you are not strong.

For larger gardens, you might want to use a wider tiller that can do the same work in less time.  The only downside is that these machines can be extremely heavy, and so they can be difficult to maneuver in the garden.

For more information, check out the rear-tine tillers in the table at the beginning of the article.

If you think you need a rear-tine rototiller but are not strong enough to do the work, consider hiring someone to help you out.  For more information, check out my article on how much rototilling costs.

How Deep Can A Rear-Tine Tiller Dig?

A rear-tine tiller can dig as deep as 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 centimeters) into the soil.  They can also make short work of breaking new ground where light front-tine or mid-tine tillers might fail.

Of course, heavy rear-tine tillers also have the best chance to cut through large roots from trees or shrubs.

A rear-tine tiller is the best choice for tilling and turning up new ground.  A rear-tine tiller can also be used to loosen and aerate soil, year after year, in established gardens.

How Wide Is A Tiller?

The width of a tiller can vary from 12 inches (1 foot) all the way up to 36 inches (3 feet) or more.  The width will depend on the type of machine, and some tillers have adjustable widths.

Rear-tine tillers often have a width of 12 to 24 inches (much wider and the machines would be too heavy to handle!)

Will A Tiller Cut Through Grass?

A tiller can cut through grass, but it is advisable to use a rear-tine tiller, since it is the most powerful type you can buy.

grass
Use a rear-tine rototiller to help you cut through grass roots more easily.

Front-tine and mid-tine tillers may not be powerful enough to cut through the matted roots of grass.  Even if they do, you will have a much harder time than if you used a rear-tine tiller.

Will A Tiller Break Up Roots?

Yes, but a powerful rear-tine tiller is the only one I would suggest for breaking up thick roots.  The bigger the roots, the more horsepower you will need.

This means that you need a bigger and heavier machine, so consider renting a rototiller or hiring someone to do the work for you.

Can You Use A Rototiller In Rocky Soil?

You can use a rototiller with small rocks in the soil, but large rocks can damage the machine.  A rototiller will have an easier time working the soil if rocks are removed first.

rocky soil
It is worth taking the time to remove rocks from your soil before using a rototiller, to reduce the risk of breaking your machine.

For more information, check out my article on how to get rid of rocks in soil.

Conclusion

By now, you have a much better idea of how much a rototiller weighs, along with some other considerations (tilling width and depth).

I hope you found this article helpful – if so, please share it with someone who can use the information.  If you have any questions about the weight of rototillers, please leave a comment below.

jonathon.david.madore

Hi, I'm Jonathon. I’m the gardening guy (not guru!) who is encouraging everyone to spend more time in the garden. I try to help solve common gardening problems so that you can get the best harvest every year!

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